A Festive Thanksgiving Cocktail with Low Vision and Blindness Adaptations

As the holiday season approaches, creative drinks and cocktails are in demand! We especially like this non-alcoholic, easy-to-assemble drink – along with adaptations for our favorite blind and visually impaired “mixologists.”

Apple Cider Milkshake

Photo of Apple Cider Milkshake in a goblet

From MaryBeth at Dunkin Cooking the Semi-Homemade Way (used with permission), who says this about the Apple Cider Milkshake: “I highly recommend giving this a try. It’s a great-tasting shake and an excellent way to enjoy the taste of apples.”

Ingredients:

  • 6 scoops vanilla ice cream
  • 1¼ cups apple juice
  • ½ tablespoon ground cinnamon

Place all ingredients into a blender.
Blend on high speed for approximately one minute.
Serve in a glass of your choice.
Yield: Two goblets/glasses

Here are some practical, easy-to-implement adaptations for mixologists who are blind, visually impaired, or have low vision (and all other mixologists, too).

Measuring Your Drink Ingredients

Use a long-handled measuring spoon placed over a larger flat-bottomed measuring cup. If the spoon overflows, the excess liquid will spill into the cup and can be returned to the bottle or container with a funnel.

Use a white measuring spoon for darker liquids and place it over a dark measuring cup for better contrast:

A white measuring spoon placed over the handle of a dark measuring cup for better contrast

Use a dark measuring spoon for white liquids and place it over a white measuring cup for better contrast:

A dark measuring spoon placed over the handle of a white measuring cup for better contrast

You can also place your jigger or shot glass inside a larger flat-bottomed measuring cup:

A silver jigger placed inside a white one-cup flat-bottomed measuring cup

And place your measuring cup inside a larger contrasting bowl:

A dark measuring cup placed over the rim of a larger bright yellow bowl

Pouring Tips and Tricks

Electronic liquid level indicators will beep, buzz, vibrate, or play music to indicate when the rising liquid is close to the top rim of the glass.

When you pour, use an electronic liquid level indicator on the rim of your glass to help prevent overflow:

The prongs of an electronic liquid level indicator are placed over the rim of a clear old-fashioned glass

You can even use an electronic liquid level indicator with your champagne glass!

The prongs of an electronic liquid level indicator are placed over the rim of a tall champagne flute

If You Have Diabetes

Although this recipe isn’t for you if you have diabetes, you can find a wealth of information to help with meal planning, diabetes-appropriate recipes, and portion control at Resources and Support for Adults with Diabetes and Diabetic Retinopathy and How Can I Manage My Diabetes? on the VisionAware website.

Additional Resources

For additional information about pouring, eating, and kitchen techniques, you can explore Hints for Easier Eating and Pouring, the Locating Technique, and Safe Cooking Techniques for Cooks Who Are Blind or Have Low Vision.

Enjoy your holiday, everyone!

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